Public hearing set to give neighbors space to voice concerns on Indian Point decommissioning

Northern Westchester residents will get to voice their concerns Tuesday during a public hearing about the company set to decommission Indian Point.
The clock is ticking as the power plant is set to shut down for good at the end of April.
People who live near the Indian Point nuclear facility say they have major concerns about what happens when the $2.3 billion decommissioning fund transfers to Holtec International and SNC-Lavalin.
"They combined have a history of bribery, of malfeasance, they have been involved in numerous scandals," says neighbor Courtney Williams.
That's why she plans to voice her opposition to the license transfer during Tuesday's Public Service Commission public hearing.
"We really need the Public Service Commission to step up and do what the NRC wouldn't do, listen to the community, take these comments to heart and really do the right thing," she says.
Hudson Valley Gateway Chamber President Deborah Milone believes Holtec will do the job of decommissioning right and opening up the property for development.
"If this land stays dormant for 60 years, it's going to have a tremendously negative impact on this area," she says.
A spokesperson for Holtec International says the company "has the technical expertise, innovations and industry leading experience to promptly decommission shutdown nuclear plants safely and efficiently."
Cortlandt Town Supervisor Linda Puglisi isn't convinced.
"We have many questions we believe need to be answered prior to the transfer from Entergy to Holtec," she says.
The state's attorney general is now suing the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which denied the state's petition for a public hearing on the transfer of Indian Point's license to Holtec.