Prison conversations shed light on Robert Durst's mental state, depths he went to evade justice

The 2019 conversations with Susan Giordano, one of his closest confidantes, shed light on Durst’s mental state before he died and shows the depths Durst went to evade justice.

Lee Danuff and Tara Rosenblum

Apr 15, 2024, 9:38 PM

Updated 38 days ago

Share:

The Turn to Tara team got first access to prison calls made by convicted killer Robert Durst - calls that could land at the center of an explosive legal proceeding in Westchester County.
The 2019 conversations with Susan Giordano, one of his closest confidantes, shed light on Durst’s mental state before he died and shows the depths Durst went to evade justice.
During the call, the late New York real estate heir-turned-killer admits his health was starting to deteriorate just as he was set to stand trial for the murder of another close confidante, Susan Berman.
Two years after that phone call, a Los Angeles jury convicted him of first-degree murder in the death of Berman.
An indictment followed in his home county of Westchester that was connected to the disappearance of his first wife, Kathie, who vanished from their South Salem home back in 1982.
The murders linked to Robert Durst made him a focus of the true crime genre, but his death left a legacy of unanswered questions and unresolved justice.
Bob Abrams is currently fighting a wrongful death lawsuit in Westchester County on behalf of Kathie Durst’s family.
In a recent filing, he argued Kathie Durst’s family, the McCormacks, should be the sole beneficiaries of Robert Durst's $35 million estate, not his current wife Debra Charatan, who Abrams argues helped Durst cover up his crimes for financial gain.
Read the will HERE.
He’s hoping the phone calls will serve as proof.
At one point in the phone calls, Durst admitted to Giordano that he concealed his assets to avoid the family's mounting legal filings.
“The trustees are acting schmucky. They insisted that before they make new payments, that I transfer the condominium that I live in, in Houston, to the trustees. That’s the only asset that’s left in my name. And theoretically, if one of these McCormack family lawsuits were decided against me... they could claim the condo. But now they can’t,” says Durst during the phone call.
In 2015, police raided Giordano's Hudson Valley home and discovered another treasure trove of Durst's personal documents, including sensitive family trust paperwork.
But now it’s her last conversations with him that offer the most revealing glimpse into mindset of a depraved killer in his final days.
The Turn To Tara team also obtained several tense phone calls between Durst and his current wife as the case against him proceeded in California and New York.


More from News 12