Officials, community discuss impact of act that will seal certain criminal records

According to the governor's website, the act allows certain criminal records to be sealed years after a person is sentenced or released from incarceration.

Jade Nash

May 1, 2024, 12:30 AM

Updated 28 days ago

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Elected officials and formerly incarcerated individuals discussed the impact of the Clean Slate Act at a Town Hall meeting on Tuesday.
The event was hosted in part by the Youth Shelter Program of Westchester and held at SUNY Westchester's Mount Vernon Extension Center.
Panelists delved into the benefits of the act that goes into effect on Nov. 16.
According to the governor's website, the act allows certain criminal records to be sealed years after a person is sentenced or released from incarceration.
The website explains that the act applies to eligible individuals who also have not been subsequently convicted of an additional criminal act.
Ismael Diaz, a formerly incarcerated individual and activist, spoke at the panel.
He told News 12 that he believes the act has the power to change the lives of those who have criminal records.
"That will allow them to get housing, it will allow them to get a job, it will seal the records so that landlords and employers will not be able to see records," Diaz said. "Only the law enforcement."


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