Commuters at Irvington train station receive ‘Ashes to Go’

Rev. Evans, along Rev. Blaine Crawford, of the Irvington Presbyterian Church. offer an alternative by bringing the ashes directly to the people, making it more accessible for individuals on the move.

Lisa LaRocca

Feb 14, 2024, 1:43 PM

Updated 65 days ago

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Those hoping to receive ashes Wednesday for the first day of Lent did do so "on the go" at the Irvington train station.
Reverend Gareth Evans, rector of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church in Irvington, initiated this practice about seven years ago, aiming to bring the spirit of the holy day beyond the confines of church walls.
Ash Wednesday holds significance in many Christian denominations as a day of prayer and fasting, marking the start of the six-week period of penitence leading up to Easter. It serves as a time for reflection, prayer, and penance.
Typically, believers attend special Ash Wednesday church services where they receive ashes on their foreheads. These ashes are traditionally prepared by burning palm leaves from the previous year's Palm Sunday celebrations. However, Rev. Evans offers an alternative by bringing the ashes directly to the people, making it more accessible for individuals on the move.
Reverends Evans and Crawford will be back at the train station later today from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. for anyone coming off the trains or for folks who are driving by.
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