Black Maternal Health Week: Data reveals women of color continue to face preventable dangers during childbirth

In 2022, Tara Rosenblum exposed data revealing the tri-state as one of the most dangerous places in America for women of color to give birth.

Lee Danuff and Tara Rosenblum

Apr 17, 2024, 10:46 PM

Updated 32 days ago

Share:

Women of color continue to face preventable dangers during childbirth, according to the latest data.
In 2022, the Turn To Tara Team exposed data revealing the tri-state as one of the most dangerous places in America for women of color to give birth.
Black mothers in the U.S. are three times more likely to die in childbirth than white women and 12 times more likely in New York City.
News 12's coverage was followed by even more publicity and funding to tackle the problem.
Has anything changed in two years?
The Turn To Tara Team obtained the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, just ahead of Black Maternal Health Week.
The data shows Black women are still disproportionately dying during childbirth and facing fatal pregnancy-related complications - three times more often than white mothers do.
It's a complex crisis that many advocates believe is the result of structural racism and discrimination in health care.
"It's a public health crisis and we can do better locally, nationally and globally," says Cheryl Brannan, of Sister To Sister International. "Why do Black women need to die at these rates? Why do our children need to die at these rates?"
Brannan is fighting to change the data. She created the Westchester Black Maternal and Child Center of Excellence to bring government, nonprofit and faith-based leaders all under one roof.
They have already organized town hall-style meetings and earmarked more than $1 million to tackle the crisis in their first year.
"Since we have everyone coming together it's collaborative it's using collective impact and that is what helps the making difference we are not working in silos," says Brannan.
A Long Island group called the Birth Justice Warriors is also on a mission to make sure pregnant women of color understand their health options before, during and after childbirth.
"My job and everyone's job is to try and advocate for our patients and let them know that they are the champions of their health," says Dr. Sandy Dorcelus, OBGYN at NYU Langone Hospital.


More from News 12