Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park is complete – first part of $1B project to boost tourism

Thomas Mulroy of T-Rex Capital Group, an investor in the Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park along Route 9, wanted to create something to boost tourism but also promote local food, wine and history that draw visitors to the area.

Ben Nandy

Feb 27, 2024, 10:56 PM

Updated 52 days ago

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After years of planning and construction, developers are celebrating the completion of the first phase of a $1 billion project meant to keep tourists in Hyde Park more frequently, for several days at a time.
Thomas Mulroy of T-Rex Capital Group, an investor in the Bellefield at Historic Hyde Park along Route 9, wanted to create something to boost tourism but also promote local food, wine and history that draw visitors to the area.
"We'll have almost $150,000 worth of artwork," Mulroy said, "mostly from the FDR and the local Hudson Valley area, local artists."
The art pieces will be displayed and hung before this May's grand opening. The soft opening was in January.
Mulroy said the overall vision for the area is for a sustainable agrifood destination.
The 137 extended-stay suites have kitchens with refrigerators. There is a laundry facility, a bar that is about to open, and a gym furnished with new equipment including four Peloton exercise bikes.
The hotel caters to tourists who visit the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Historic Site, collect antiques and take cooking classes at the Culinary Art Institute of America.
The CIA is directly across Route 9 from the Bellefield and draws visitors from out of town for its short-term classes with top chefs.
Mulroy expects the Bellefield to give tourists a reason to spend multiple days at a time in the area, not just come for day trips.
"If you're coming up for a weekend for cooking classes...there's really no place to say, so this helps fill that need," he said during an interview in the hotel lobby. "It helps the CIA. It helps the FDR. It helps Marist bring in the tourism."
National Parks Superintendent Amy Bracewell, who oversees the Home of FDR Historic Site told News 12, day trippers do not get the full experience.
"I think it's impossible to get to everything in one day," Bracewell said when reached by phone Tuesday afternoon. "You may be able to do a tour and have lunch, but there's much more – Locust Grove, Staatsburg, Rhinebeck."
Developers have already planned several more phases including a little village, town homes and another hotel. The next phase is the village, which will include restaurant and retail space and some housing. Construction may begin before the end of the year.
Mulroy said the entire vision may end up taking up to eight years to fulfill. He said locals are welcome to visit, order food and drinks as they become available, and use the amenities.


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