Fares on Cross-Hudson ferries and buses to be slashed for Orange and Rockland residents to as low as $1 per ride

The move comes as government officials and commuters west of the Hudson River have been pressing for relief from the upcoming congestion pricing program because their public rail service is lacking.

Ben Nandy

May 10, 2024, 2:39 PM

Updated 18 days ago

Share:

Leaders of the Metropolitan Transit Authority gathered in the Croton-Harman station's newly renovated train maintenance shop to announce a list of discounts just for Orange and Rockland residents.
The move comes as government officials and commuters west of the Hudson River have been pressing for relief from the upcoming congestion pricing program because their public rail service is lacking.
“It is no secret that the folks who live west of the Hudson River don’t get the same quality of frequency and reliability of service as we have on the Hudson, Harlem, and New Haven Lines," MTA Chair Janno Lieber said. "As we approach the onset of congestion pricing, we want to make sure there are a few more options for people in Orange and Rockland Counties to get to this amazing Metro-North service.”
The Haverstraw-Ossining Ferry will add weekend service from 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., instead of only during weekday rush hours.
The discounts include:
The MTA will institute deep discounts on ferry service, bus fares and parking.
Monthly passes for the Haverstraw-Ossining Ferry will drop from $43.75 to $13.75.
Monthly passes for the Newburgh-Beacon Ferry will drop from $13.75 to $1.00.
Monthly passes for Newburgh-Beacon bus will also drop from $10.00 to $1.00.
Monthly Hudson Link bus passes will be cut in half, going from $60.00 to $30.00.
"It's very expensive," Haverstraw commuter Jaime Rodriguez said in Spanish of his twice-a-week roundtrip into New York City, and praising the MTA's decision to cut fares.
He and several other commuters said their first wish was for an overhaul of train service west of the Hudson that would eventually provide Orange and Rockland residents a "one-seat trip" into New York City.
"There's a train on this side, not with passengers, just cargo," he said of freight trains that run through Haverstraw. "They should try to find a way to put people on that train."
Lieber said that since New Jersey Transit runs much of the train service and some tracks are owned by freight companies, the MTA does not have much control over rail service west of the Hudson. Hence, the financial relief.
"We can't do enough to make them that much better for passenger service," he said, "so we want to do something about it."
The service increases and discounts go into effect May 25.
Rockland County Executive Ed Day, an outspoken critic of the MTA because of underinvestment in Rockland, said in an email Friday he is pleased with the discount package, and plans to press for improvements Lieber said are not currently possible.
"This is a great first step towards improving and expanding transit service from Rockland County, as was required by the State's congestion pricing authorizing legislation," County Executive Day said. "We look forward to MTA’s next step, which should be making a funding commitment in its Capital Plan for the Gateway and Bergen Loop projects and the corresponding Pascack Valley line investments that must be made in order to provide Rockland County’s one-seat-ride."


More from News 12