Cuomo and Astorino clash on vision for NY

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his Republican challenger Rob Astorino traded insults and clashed over the economy and corruption during the only scheduled debate of the governor's race last night.

News 12 Staff

Oct 23, 2014, 4:09 PM

Updated 3,501 days ago

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Cuomo and Astorino clash on vision for NY
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his Republican challenger Rob Astorino traded insults and clashed over the economy and corruption during the only scheduled debate of the governor's race last night.
During Wednesday's hour-long exchange Cuomo, a Democrat, cited his work to cut taxes and make government more efficient. "We now have the lowest taxes in over 50 years, we have more jobs than we've ever had before and we have Democrats and Republicans working together again." He said Astorino's views on abortion, immigration and housing desegregation make him too conservative to lead New York.
Astorino, the Westchester County executive, criticized Cuomo over allegations that his administration meddled with an anti-corruption commission. He also said the governor hasn't helped energize the economy. "We're losing badly; we have the highest taxes in America, the worst business climate; we have the worst economic outlook, our economic recovery is an anemic [at] .7 percent," said Astorino.
The new Tappan Zee Bridge was also on the agenda, but there were still no clear answers on how it will be paid for. "We don't have the final cost for the bridge; we're applying for more federal funds. We're looking for state subsidies, and we will figure out the toll when we know the final cost," said Cuomo.
"We were supposed to know what the tolls were, which [they are] absolutely going to double or triple, but he won't say anything until after the election, he has no financing plan. He tried to swipe $500 million from an environmental clean water fund to pay for it. That's how desperate he is," countered Astorino.
Two third-party candidates also participated. Green Party candidate Howie Hawkins voiced opposition to hydraulic fracturing, while Libertarian Michael McDermott said voters deserve alternatives to the major parties.
AP wires were used in this report


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