Bronx feces attack suspect charged in separate Brooklyn hate crime

Police say the Bronx man who attacked a woman with feces at a Bronx subway station has been arrested again, this time in a Brooklyn hate crime.

News 12 Staff

Mar 2, 2022, 6:47 PM

Updated 817 days ago

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Police say the Bronx man who attacked a woman with feces at a Bronx subway station has been arrested again, this time in a Brooklyn hate crime.
Frank Abrokwa, 37, had already been arrested in an attack on a woman at the Wakefield - 241st Street station on Feb. 21. The woman was sitting when Abrokwa allegedly walked up to her and smeared a bag of human feces into her face and body.
He was released from custody after his arraignment for that incident, and was subsequently rearrested by officers on Tuesday and charged with aggravated harassment as a hate crime, menacing as a hate crime and disorderly conduct for an incident on Sept. 9, 2021, in which he allegedly approached a man on Utica Avenue in Brooklyn, made antisemitic statements and spit on him.
The arrest in the hate crime marked the third time Abrokwa was arrested in less than a month.
Court documents show he had previously been taken into custody on Feb. 22 after he allegedly took a screwdriver from a sales rack at Deluca Hardware on White Plains Road and threatened store employees with it, just one day after he allegedly smeared feces in a woman's face, though he had not yet been arrested for that incident at the time.
Mayor Eric Adams released a statement on Thursday saying:
"This individual should not be out on the streets of New York and his release shows the scope of changes that we need to make in order to keep New Yorkers safe. It is the result of a failed mental health system, a failed housing and support system, and failing criminal justice laws that allow someone with a history of violence who poses a clear threat to public safety to just walk out of court. We can't allow this horrific situation to be the status quo and must make changes to our laws to both prevent these sort of attacks, through intervention and support, and, when they happen, to subsequently keep people who are clearly a danger to others off the street."


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