Alternative options to decommission Indian Point dwindling

Holtec, which is responsible for the plant's decommissioning, and the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission shot down alternatives to dumping into the river throughout Thursday's Indian Point Decommissioning Oversight meeting.

Jonathan Gordon

Jun 16, 2023, 2:27 AM

Updated 312 days ago

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Despite a strong show of support from concerned residents, Buchanan Mayor Theresa Knickerbocker said the village will not approve any permits to store nuclear wastewater on the Indian Point site.
This was just one of the alternative decommissioning proposals community members had voiced over the last few years, hoping to avoid the dumping of treated nuclear wastewater into the Hudson River.
Holtec, which is responsible for the plant's decommissioning and the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission shot down alternatives to dumping waste into the river throughout Thursday's Indian Point Decommissioning Oversight meeting.
Knickerbocker said there's no way to decommission the plant without some environmental impact. She said it's important for the village to move forward.
"I love the river. I'm not looking to hurt it. I don't think there's anybody looking to hurt it. We want the safe, prompt decommissioning of the Indian Point facility. But what I just want to say to you even in the atmosphere, it's in the atmosphere, so you're never going to get a zero," said Buchanan Mayor Theresa Knickerbocker.
Many in the crowd were not happy.
Holtec could still have a problem on its hands.
The state Assembly version of the bill, sponsored by state Assemblywoman Dana Levenberg, passed through committee but never made it to the floor.
Holtec did not address the bill's passing.
The state Assembly is scheduled to reconvene next week where it could take up a vote on Levenberg's bill.
It's unclear if Gov. Kathy Hochul would sign the bill if the state Assembly passes it.
Holtec is currently still scheduled to begin dumping the Unit 2 spent fuel this September.


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