FCC publishes proposal to replace net neutrality rules

Posted: Updated:
YONKERS -

The FCC released a controversial plan aimed at dismantling Obama-era protections intended to keep the internet open and fair.

Under current net neutrality rules put in place back in 2015, large internet service providers, or ISPs, are barred from speeding up or slowing down traffic from specific websites and apps.

It also prevents companies from charging customers extra fees for high-quality streaming and other services.

In statement earlier this week, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said under his plan the federal government will stop micromanaging the internet and instead rely on ISPs to be transparent about their practices.

“The proposed rule change would be the equivalent of privatizing the interstate highway system,” says Yonkers web-based business owner Jon Burr. “First of all, my internet service provider is going to have to buy in, so my rates are gonna go up there. I'm gonna have to charge my customers more."

The FCC will vote on the repeal at its monthly hearing on Dec. 14. The Republican-led agency is expected to approve it on a party-line vote.

Online giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon have come out against the FCC's planned repeal of current net neutrality rules. The companies say it would make telecom companies powerful gatekeepers to the internet.

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