First case of monkeypox reported in Hudson Valley

Officials say those who experience symptoms consistent with monkeypox, such as characteristic rashes or lesions, should contact their health care provider for a risk assessment.

News 12 Staff

Jun 8, 2022, 10:37 AM

Updated 721 days ago

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State health officials say as of now there are 9 confirmed cases of monkeypox in New York with eight in New York City, and now, one case in the Hudson Valley.
Doctors say the symptoms of monkeypox start seven to 14 days after infection. "Beginning with flu-like symptoms, enlarged lymph nodes muscle aches," says Dr. Robert Amler, dean of the New York Medical College School of Health Sciences and Practice.
Once those symptoms start, rashes and lesions will begin to form on the face and body within one to three days.
The good news is there is already a treatment. "There is a vaccine against monkeypox and the good ol' smallpox vaccine from decades ago is also effective, so if this were to break out in a major way, we already have protective vaccines and we have antiviral drugs," says Amler.
U.S. health officials have already rolled out about 1,200 doses of the vaccine for monkeypox and are ramping up testing and contact tracing. So far, all patients in the U.S. are being treated or have recovered.
Officials say those who experience symptoms consistent with monkeypox, such as characteristic rashes or lesions, should contact their health care provider for a risk assessment.
This includes anyone who traveled to countries where monkeyPox cases have been reported, anyone who has had contact with a someone with a similar rash or anyone who received a diagnosis of suspected or confirmed monkeypox.
“In concert with the NYS Department of Health, we continue to closely monitor this case, which is limited to just one individual. There is no identified risk to any County residents, as the individual had traveled outside the USA and was no longer contagious by the time they returned to Sullivan County. As we have done with COVID-19, Sullivan County Public Health remains vigilant and ready to respond to communicable diseases of all types, and should there be any public health risk, we will promptly make notice to our residents and visitors," Nancy McGraw, Sullivan County Public Health director.   


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