As ball drops, minimum-wage workers in NY will see pay rise

Posted: Updated:
NEW YORK -

The lowest-paid workers in New York state will have something to look forward to in the new year: a higher minimum wage.

Gov. Cuomo announced that the minimum wage increase will take effect on December 31, 2018, jumping from $11 per hour to $12 per hour in select areas, with the biggest boost going to employees in New York City, who will make at least $15 per hour.

That will make New York City join Seattle and San Francisco as the major American cities to have hit that benchmark.

The minimum wage in Westchester and Long Island is set to go up one dollar every year on New Year’s Eve until it hits $15 in 2021.

While the increase is hopeful news to some people, many small business owners and employers are concerned about the wage increase, saying it could mean raising prices or having employees double their workload. Some small business owners say the change might even force them to shut down.

For employers and employees looking for more information about the change, there is a public education campaign happening throughout the state on the subway, TV, radio and online.

The governor has also announced that there is a wage theft hotline for workers to report employers who are not complying with the phase-in schedule.

AP Wires contributed to this report.

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