Supreme Court adopts new rules for cellphone tracking

Posted: Updated:

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court says police generally need a search warrant if they want to track criminal suspects' movements by collecting information about where they've used their cellphones.

The justices' 5-4 decision Friday is a victory for privacy in the digital age.

That's a big change from the old days when authorities could go to the phone company and obtain information about the numbers dialed from a home telephone without presenting a warrant.

Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the majority opinion, joined by the court's four liberals.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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