Legislators: State railroad crossing safety report overdue

Posted: Updated:
VALHALLA -

State leaders held a news conference Monday at the site of the deadliest crash in Metro-North history, blasting the state Department of Transportation and demanding it do something to make rail grade crossings in the Hudson Valley safer to drivers.

The lawmakers say the DOT was supposed to produce a study on the rail grade crossings by April, but they are still waiting.

"We don't know if they've commissioned an outside study. We don't know if it's sitting on someone's desk. All we get is 'We're working on it.' Working on is not enough. We don't want to wait for the next accident to happen," says state Assemblyman Tom Abinanti.

The lawmakers stopped short of calling on the DOT to close many of the state's more than 5,000 rail crossings, as many people have called for, but they insist they are open to suggestions.

News 12 reached out to the state DOT but calls were not returned.

The news conference was held at the site of the 2015 deadly crash on Commerce Street in Valhalla. After an almost a 2 ½-year investigation, the National Transportation Safety Board determined it was the actions of 49-year-old Ellen Brody, of Edgemont, that caused the deadly crash that took her life and that of five passengers on the train.

sorry to interrupt
your first 20 are free
Access to News 12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Time Warner® and Service ElectricSM customers.
Please enjoy 20 complimentary views of articles, photos, and videos during the next 30 days.
you have reached your 5 view limit
Access to News 12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Time Warner® and Service ElectricSM customers.
Please login, create an account or subscribe to continue enjoying News12.
Our sign-up page is undergoing maintenance and is not currently available. However, you will be given direct access to news12.com while we complete our upgrade.
When we are back up and running you will be prompted at that time to complete your sign in. Until then, enjoy the local news, weather, traffic and more that's "as local as local news gets."