Sugary drinks could soon have warning labels

A New York City politician is following in former Mayor Michael Bloomberg's steps and picking a battle with sugary drinks.



Brooklyn Assemblyman Karim Camara is introducing legislation that would require a warning label on regular sodas and other drinks with added sugar, similar to the labels found on cigarettes.



The label would warn consumers that drinking beverages with added sugar contributes to health problems such as obesity, diabetes and tooth decay. The size of the label would depend on the size of the drink it is being placed on.



The American Beverage Association argues that a warning label will not change behaviors or teach people about healthy lifestyles.



Camara says that more than 20 years of scientific research shows that sugary drinks are a primary contributor to type 2 diabetes, especially in children. He says the beverage industry spent $13 million to propose a sugary drink tax in 2010.



He adds that education is the best way to combat the problem, rather than a sugary drink ban.



The American Heart Association says an average adult should only consume between six and nine teaspoons of sugar a day. Health experts say that there is about nine teaspoons of sugar in a typical 12-ounce soda.


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