5 baby raccoons abandoned in Mount Kisco could pose rabies risk

The Westchester County Health Department has issued a rabies alert after five baby raccoons were left on its office doorstep in Mount Kisco. Westchester County

Westchester County Health Commissioner Sherlita Amler says that

Westchester County Health Commissioner Sherlita Amler says that while the raccoons appear to be healthy and well cared for, they could be infected with rabies.

MOUNT KISCO - The Westchester County Health Department has issued a rabies alert after five baby raccoons were left on its office doorstep in Mount Kisco.

Westchester County Health Commissioner Sherlita Amler says that while the raccoons appear to be healthy and well cared for, they could be infected with rabies.

Amler is asking for the person who left the raccoons to come forward right away, saying that if the animals are infected, the person who cared for them is also at risk.

Amler says the raccoons may have to be killed if the Health Department can't determine where they came from.

The Westchester County Health Department is asking for the person who cared for the baby raccoons to call it at 813-5000.

More on this topic

advertisement | advertise on News 12

Trending Video

Kristina's Korner tracks the 1 Trending: "Angelina Jolie Eats Spiders"
VIDEO: Yonkers woman arraigned for alleged attempted murder 2 VIDEO: Yonkers woman arraigned for alleged attempted murder
Vote set for tonight on whether or not 3 Vote tonight on plan to allow alcohol sales on Long Beach boardwalk
The 27th Annual Pearl River Train Show is 4 Pearl River Train Show steams forward
Old Westbury women's basketball starts playoffs with 22 5 Old Westbury women's basketball starts playoffs with 22 wins

advertisement | advertise on News 12

Features

Sorry to interrupt...

Your first 5 are free

Access to News12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Time Warner® and Service Electric℠ video customers.

Please enjoy 5 complimentary views to articles, photos, and videos during the next 30 days.

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE